U.S. Citizenship and Naturalization

Deciding to become a U.S. citizen is one of the most important decisions an immigrant can make. Naturalized U.S. citizens share equally in the rights and privileges of U.S. citizenship. U.S. citizenship offers immigrants the ability to:

  • Vote in Federal elections
  • Travel with a U.S. Passport
  • Run for elective office where citizenship is required
  • Participate on a jury
  • Become eligible for federal and certain law enforcement jobs
  • Obtain certain State and Federal benefits not available to noncitizens
  • Obtain citizenship for minor children born abroad
  • Expand and expedite their ability to bring family members to the United States

General Eligibility Requirements for Naturalization:

  • The applicant must be age 18 or older at the time of filing for naturalization
  • The applicant must be an LPR for at least five years before being eligible for naturalization
  • The applicant must have continuous residence in the United States as an LPR for at least five years immediately preceding the date of filing the application and up to the time of admission to citizenship
  • The applicant must be physically present in the United States for at least 30 months out of the five years immediately preceding the date of filing the application
  • The applicant must have lived within the State or USCIS district with jurisdiction over the applicant’s place of residence for at least three months prior to the date of filing
  • The applicant must demonstrate good moral character for five years prior to filing for naturalization, and during the period leading up to the administration of the Oath of Allegiance.
  • The applicant must be able to read, write, and speak and understand English and have knowledge and an understanding of U.S. history and government.

Some exceptions to these requirements may apply depending on your case. For instance, Naturalization for Spouses of U.S. Citizens may be done after three years of being an LPR. People with medical conditions can request a Medical Disability Exception in order to be exempt from taking the civic and English test. In addition, English Language Exemptions, commonly referred to as the “50/20” “55/15” exception, may apply depending on your age and years of being an LPR. Consult with us to find out whether you qualify under any of these exceptions.